Topic: Choose the starting Culture based on skills  (Read 303 times)


koteko

« on: August 28, 2017, 04:00:35 PM »
Here is a short commentary/guide to the starting cultures, based on the simple analysis of the starting skill bonuses/maluses. This should help any beginner looking to make things smoother for themselves.. or harder, if masochistic :)

  • Reemi, Sarto, Kaumo and Kiesse are quite versatile tribes, with bonuses far outweighing the maluses. Good choice for beginners, especially if the right tribe is chosen for a specific play style (eg, choose Sarto for agriculture-related characters, Kaumo for warriors and active hunters, Reemi for trappers and Kiesse for the prototypical woodsman.)
  • Owls have many maluses (which reduces their versatility in using multiple weapons and wood/construction stuff, but also fishing), but are probably the best active hunters (Kaumo is easier to play overall but takes more grinding to raise some important skills). This is your bow-sniper character, able to track down quickly the prey, kill it and produce high-quality hides, as well as identify useful herbs.
  • Seal tribes are not as bad as you would think from their -4. They are the best spear-users, club-users, fishers and "shamans". Their stealth bonus is also good. They make fun (and reality-appropriate) seal-hunters if you don't go the easy way (eg, traps): sneak up, throw your javelin/spear and club to death. I enjoyed playing as one.
  • Driik seem very "poor", but they have the best sword, shield and crossbow bonuses. Most other tribes have maluses there, or at best a zero. They might make for interesting atypical characters.
  • Islanders are the best weather predictors.. which is sadly useless (maybe for some quests? not sure). They can only swim, fish and carve wooden objects better than default, and have plenty of important maluses. More "carpentry" options (eg, fishbone carvery?) might make them more appealing in the future.
  • Kuikka are essentially lesser Owl that can fish very well (like Islanders and Seal-tribe), and carve wooden objects decently. Never got interested in playing as one.
  • Koivulanen.. these are weird. They have good Agriculture, like the Sarto, and also small tracking&trapping bonuses. They have a bonus to the least used weapon, the flail. That's it - however, they also lack significant maluses. Herblore & Physician only. So they make for the real average man, which can be interesting for the expert player.



Source of the above: the ini_skills.txt shipped with the game. I uploaded it on the wiki for easy consultation.

I found the actual file a bit hard to read - a table works much better. Also, I prefer a bonus/malus view (eg, difference compared to the default) instead of the absolute numbers.

It would be great to also have a table for attribute bonuses.. what we have was found empirically a long time ago and I'm not sure how accurate it is.

I find, however, that when planning a character I care more about the skills than the attributes, since I'm a heavy roller to get high values (or I even correct the attributes manually, if I can't be bothered to roll). So it doesn't affect me overmuch.

(URW version 3.4)
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 06:16:29 PM by koteko »

Felius

« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2017, 10:07:36 PM »
Quote
Owls have many maluses (which reduces their versatility in using multiple weapons and wood/construction stuff, but also fishing), but are probably the best active hunters (Kaumo is easier to play overall but takes more grinding to raise some important skills). This is your bow-sniper character, able to track down quickly the prey, kill it and produce high-quality hides, as well as identify useful herbs.
Just don't expect to be able to carry all the meat back home, unless you take a bull on a leash on your hunts. Or a whole lot of dogs.

Their very low weight means their maximum carrying capacity is also quite low, as is the "free" equipment weight allowance too. Specially the colder periods, where you need quite a few pounds of clothing to keep from freezing, hunting can be an exercise in waste.

koteko

« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2017, 11:06:22 PM »
Just don't expect to be able to carry all the meat back home, unless you take a bull on a leash on your hunts. Or a whole lot of dogs.

Their very low weight means their maximum carrying capacity is also quite low, as is the "free" equipment weight allowance too. Specially the colder periods, where you need quite a few pounds of clothing to keep from freezing, hunting can be an exercise in waste.

Sure, but every Owl knows to bring a reindeer or two with him when out hunting, and make temporary shelters where to leave it :)

I actually either directly leave the meat to dry where the elk died (so many bogs in the north, no lack of water to make a temporary shelter to process the skin and dry the meat), or even just push it on a tree for later collection.

spamgoose

« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2017, 02:07:14 AM »

Sure, but every Owl knows to bring a reindeer or two with him when out hunting, and make temporary shelters where to leave it :)

I actually either directly leave the meat to dry where the elk died (so many bogs in the north, no lack of water to make a temporary shelter to process the skin and dry the meat), or even just push it on a tree for later collection.

That, at least for me, is one of the big challenges in playing a pure hunter -- thinking like a nomad. There's absolutely no reason to not go far afield with a reindeer carrying cords and supplies, set up a shelter, a kota frame for drying, and process meat on the spot. Except for remembering to go back and get the dried meat. For some reason, I always get caught in the trap of "gotta get home... gotta get this home... then everything will be good". Sometimes I think the game needs a good built-in scheduling app to remind when things are done drying, when nets should be grabbed, etc. But yes, thinking like a nomad is the challenge and the true pleasure in that kind of character.