Topic: How do I ski  (Read 715 times)


Homocommando

« on: April 07, 2021, 12:42:07 AM »
I just made skis, and tried to go on first hunt with them. Turns out it was actually easier to hunt when there was no snow, because even with skis i get fatigued just from "walking", and I can't even run, so it's hard to make game flee. I followed an elk for quite some time, but when it finally got slightly fatigued, I was almost exhausted. Soon after that I couldn't catch up to it anymore, because my skiing speed was 1km.
It will get easier, when I level up skiing a bit, right?

Plotinus

« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2021, 07:17:34 AM »
As you level up in skiing, and also as the snow gets deeper. When snow is only ankle deep it might be easier to walk or run in it than to ski. Over time, you'll get a feel for which is better when. Once it is waist deep you'll be glad for the skiis. You can level up 3 skiing points (or any other skill) each day.

Skiing is one of the things that's going to change in the next version to be modelled even more realistically. Right now, it's just a matter of snow depth, but in 3.70, at certains times of year it'll melt to slush on warm sunny days and then a hard crust will freeze over it at night that is much easier to ski on.

PALU

« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2021, 10:14:08 AM »
Note, though, that skiing drains fatigue regardless of skill (high skill means lesser, but not zero drain), which means hunting during the winter is currently a fair bit harder than during the snow less seasons (an on top of that you need to encumber yourself with heavy clothing...).
As noted, you can't "run" with skis (apart from an exploit), and skiing isn't faster than walking currently.
Skiing is probably the easiest skill to improve, though, so you'll probably be at 100% after the first winter.

I assume you've seen this, but it's easy to forget to re-equip the ski stick after having performed activities, so you actually walk around on skis, gaining no benefit from them (and it doesn't help that the feedback indicating your state doesn't update when you equip them, but only after having moved a tile).

Homocommando

« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2021, 05:02:08 PM »
Skiing is one of the things that's going to change in the next version to be modelled even more realistically. Right now, it's just a matter of snow depth, but in 3.70, at certains times of year it'll melt to slush on warm sunny days and then a hard crust will freeze over it at night that is much easier to ski on.
Wouldn't that wear down skis though?
It probably won't in game, but in real life wood sliding on icy snow would wear down from friction.

Erkka

« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2021, 05:20:38 PM »
Quote
in real life wood sliding on icy snow would wear down from friction. 

based on real life experience I'd say that a wooden ski gliding on icy snow has a rather minimal friction, so I'd expect it won't wear down the ski.

What wears down wooden skis is when there isn't quite enough snow, and you suddenly hit sand, gravel, stones, rocks or asphalt (if crossing a modern road with skis on)

JP_Finn

« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2021, 09:32:01 PM »
To add to Erkka’s experience:
Skiing on icy snow is extremely slippery, one can’t get a proper kick without some hefty “grip grease” or like in the past; fur on arch, middle of the ski, under ones foot. Whereas one would want to lubricate the ends of the skis for better gliding on wet, or soft snow.
(Hair by grain to glide forward, and consequently against grain for kicks, to stop/minimize backwards glide)


And as for fatigue from skiing at grandmaster level: often the fatigue pops up to 1%, to revert back to 0% same or following turn. While skiing, not resting. High endurance really helps. Encumbrance below 10%, preferably not higher than 7%.