Topic: Sami's Bouncing arrows got revisited.  (Read 1757 times)


Tervaskanto

« on: January 11, 2021, 05:21:16 AM »
So, I was awake in the middle of the night, as I usually am, watching YouTube and found interesting video from Tod's Workshop about bouncing arrows from water surface linking to a archery channel where he got the original idea, so I thought I'd check it out since the guy looked somewhat familiar...

I had forgotten Sami had a YT channel, Ugri Archer, and of course it was his video.

Tod tried them for some duck hunting in his video, check it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAX8N8Ycs1g

Buoidda

« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2021, 05:48:34 AM »
Sewn with quill it is. X#X#X#  My craft mod 2.3.6 (released 12th of Jan 2021):  https://www.unrealworld.fi/forums/index.php?topic=5865.0

Brygun

« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2021, 08:44:54 AM »
Whelp.... I learned two new things

1) bouncing arrows are a thing

2) I definitely don't understand Finnish. So if ever manage to fund Saami visiting Canada we'll have to hope he speaks English. My French is only marginal enough to say that I don't speak French and other basic phrases.

PALU

« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2021, 10:47:49 AM »
It's not surprising that you don't understand Finnish, as it's not even an indoeuropean language, so the roots common with English (or the languages involved in the linguistic train wreck that became English) are very far back.

Sami (not Saami; that's a people) does speak English (and you can see on the forum that he writes it).

JP_Finn

« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2021, 02:03:56 AM »
I find it entertaining that he uses very formal pronunciation.

Yeah, as PALU wrote, Finnish isn't indo-european (so not Germanic, nor Romance, nor Celtic), but Uralic/Fenno-Ugrian(F-U, hehe, excludes samojedic languages). There's very few languages in the group: Finnish, Estonian, Magyar (Hungarian), and some tribes in Siberia(most of these fall in the Uralic group). Of the above, Finnish and Estonian share some vocabulary, but not fluently. Similarly to French and Italian, or Spanish. Finnish and Magyar, have even less common words. After going through a long, long time with a Hungarian friend, only reasonably close match is Finnish "pusu”, Hungarian "puszi”. In English a little kiss, a peck

So to understand Finnish, you need to know Finnish or to get mainline idea what someone is saying in Finnish, one needs to be native Estonian speaker.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2021, 03:36:04 AM by JP_Finn »

PALU

« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2021, 11:01:28 AM »
I believe you missed the Saami language(s) [linguists can fight forever over whether it's one, three, four or some other number of languages and how many dialects there are] when listing languages related to Finnish.

JP_Finn

« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2021, 07:00:11 PM »
Yes indeed. But are sámi languages fenno-permian and under wider Uralic group, no? It’s been decades since I actively studied languages. But I’d recall the sámi (9 languages IIRC) to been split, at least taxonomically, from fenno-ugrian around 2500BCE.

No, I’m not a professional linguist. Just a geek.

katlivon665

« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2021, 10:25:33 AM »
 :D

Plotinus

« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2021, 07:30:58 PM »
I find it entertaining that he uses very formal pronunciation.

Yeah, as PALU wrote, Finnish isn't indo-european (so not Germanic, nor Romance, nor Celtic), but Uralic/Fenno-Ugrian(F-U, hehe, excludes samojedic languages). There's very few languages in the group: Finnish, Estonian, Magyar (Hungarian), and some tribes in Siberia(most of these fall in the Uralic group). Of the above, Finnish and Estonian share some vocabulary, but not fluently. Similarly to French and Italian, or Spanish. Finnish and Magyar, have even less common words. After going through a long, long time with a Hungarian friend, only reasonably close match is Finnish "pusu”, Hungarian "puszi”. In English a little kiss, a peck

So to understand Finnish, you need to know Finnish or to get mainline idea what someone is saying in Finnish, one needs to be native Estonian speaker.
kéz - käsi, négy - neljä, víz - vesi

There's some patterns, too, like Hungarian "h" is often "k" in Finnish: hal - kala, hajó - koivu, holló - korpi, hold (moon)/hó (month) - kuu, három - kolme

But you have to already know the connection is there to see it. The way I tell if somebody is speaking Finnish is that it takes me a minute to notice that I can't understand a word I'm hearing -- I don't notice sooner because the cadence is very similar to Hungarian, and the vowel : consonant ratio is the same too, so it creates an illusion that if I were to pay attention then I would understand.

 

anything