Topic: Is it viable to use a pack of dogs for taking down Njerpez and robbers?  (Read 5552 times)


StefanPravda

« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2020, 10:08:38 PM »
Wolves = run for your life.

ineedcords

« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2020, 11:35:51 PM »
Wolves = run for your life.
Wolves = they outrun you.
This could be a good day to utilize your squirrels hides.

Privateer

« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2020, 12:29:48 AM »
Wolves = run for your life.
Wolves = they outrun you.

 Kind of to topic;
 I've been attacked by wolves while I had dogs. An attack from behind knocks me out, screen goes black.
I figure "welp I'm dead". To my surprise the screen comes back to focus, two dead wolves and one dead dog within 2 tiles, One injured dog by my side and one dog missing. Following the blood trail away from the site I eventually find my third dog dead.
To help is it's own reward.
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StefanPravda

« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2020, 10:53:05 AM »
I read all kind of cool adventures, why the heck don't I have those :)) Bears attacking cows near the cabin, wolves attacking behind the back, robbers ending up at you cabin. At my cabin the only thing I get is the annoying birds I have set up traps for so I get rid of them. And a lost elk.

Tom H

« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2020, 03:36:08 PM »
I read all kind of cool adventures, why the heck don't I have those :)) Bears attacking cows near the cabin, wolves attacking behind the back, robbers ending up at you cabin. At my cabin the only thing I get is the annoying birds I have set up traps for so I get rid of them. And a lost elk.

LoL...

Privateer

« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2020, 10:17:29 PM »
I read all kind of cool adventures, why the heck don't I have those :)) Bears attacking cows near the cabin, wolves attacking behind the back, robbers ending up at you cabin. At my cabin the only thing I get is the annoying birds I have set up traps for so I get rid of them. And a lost elk.

 The only advice I can give is maybe you need to die more? Creating more opportunities to see rare(r) events.

Yea.. That's why I die so much ;)
To help is it's own reward.
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StefanPravda

« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2020, 10:27:16 PM »
Lol v.2 :D

Ara D.

« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2020, 09:52:57 PM »
On dealing with auto drop into wolves. You always start with your pets and companions to your east, and nobody agroed. Shift r to run always fight in run, your faster in run and thus more action, it more or less a free action switch between running and walking. then start to leash your dogs. I think wolves are some of the best modeled behaviors in the game. They are masters of hit and run, and if given a choice dislike a straight up toe to paw fight. Look around using the 9 key to flip 180 degrees, less actions to see the whole area. At this point if no wolf has attacked try to back away from the pack in what ever direction has the fewest furry gold mines, I mean death traps. Pick up any rocks and sticks that cross your path. At least in the last version I found that when hit by a throw rock or stick they will run away for a bit. Use that if one or more attacks you. Break their charge with a rock and keep backing away. Punches and kicks also seem to cause a "tactical retreat" reaction more than weapons do.

In short always try to maintain visual on the wolves get your dogs leashed and the goal is to get far enough away to zoom out so your objective in a fight is to get them to run, not to kill them all. That's what traps are for.

ineedcords

« Reply #23 on: February 27, 2020, 12:55:00 AM »
On dealing with auto drop into wolves. You always start with your pets and companions to your east, and nobody agroed. Shift r to run always fight in run, your faster in run and thus more action, it more or less a free action switch between running and walking. then start to leash your dogs. I think wolves are some of the best modeled behaviors in the game. They are masters of hit and run, and if given a choice dislike a straight up toe to paw fight. Look around using the 9 key to flip 180 degrees, less actions to see the whole area. At this point if no wolf has attacked try to back away from the pack in what ever direction has the fewest furry gold mines, I mean death traps. Pick up any rocks and sticks that cross your path. At least in the last version I found that when hit by a throw rock or stick they will run away for a bit. Use that if one or more attacks you. Break their charge with a rock and keep backing away. Punches and kicks also seem to cause a "tactical retreat" reaction more than weapons do.

In short always try to maintain visual on the wolves get your dogs leashed and the goal is to get far enough away to zoom out so your objective in a fight is to get them to run, not to kill them all. That's what traps are for.
Thank you. I'll give it a try next time I come face to face with the kings of URW.
This could be a good day to utilize your squirrels hides.

Tom H

« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2020, 07:20:52 PM »
The first time I ever encountered wolves I was a complete rookie. I fired some arrows and engaged in melee with one, then another who came along. I killed the first and the 2nd ran off SO, I started skinning the deader...and wolves kept returning, fighting, and running away! In the end, I got the skin and got away, having learned the wrong lesson- that wolves are not too dangerous.

The NEXT time I got dropped into a wolf pack I was hit from behind almost immediately and hamstrung. More charged in and, as I fought the ones I could see from my position lying on the ground, I was repeatedly hit from behind and, properly, killed. From this, I learned a better lesson- Run away! Wolves are for trapping, not fighting!

Honestly, I'm more afraid of a wolf pack than any single Njerp.

Labtop 215

« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2020, 12:25:25 AM »
The first time I ever encountered wolves I was a complete rookie. I fired some arrows and engaged in melee with one, then another who came along. I killed the first and the 2nd ran off SO, I started skinning the deader...and wolves kept returning, fighting, and running away! In the end, I got the skin and got away, having learned the wrong lesson- that wolves are not too dangerous.

The NEXT time I got dropped into a wolf pack I was hit from behind almost immediately and hamstrung. More charged in and, as I fought the ones I could see from my position lying on the ground, I was repeatedly hit from behind and, properly, killed. From this, I learned a better lesson- Run away! Wolves are for trapping, not fighting!

Honestly, I'm more afraid of a wolf pack than any single Njerp.

Honestly, wolf packs are more dangerous than Njerp packs because wolves can move much faster.

ineedcords

« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2021, 06:05:04 PM »
On dealing with auto drop into wolves. You always start with your pets and companions to your east, and nobody agroed. Shift r to run always fight in run, your faster in run and thus more action, it more or less a free action switch between running and walking. then start to leash your dogs. I think wolves are some of the best modeled behaviors in the game. They are masters of hit and run, and if given a choice dislike a straight up toe to paw fight. Look around using the 9 key to flip 180 degrees, less actions to see the whole area. At this point if no wolf has attacked try to back away from the pack in what ever direction has the fewest furry gold mines, I mean death traps. Pick up any rocks and sticks that cross your path. At least in the last version I found that when hit by a throw rock or stick they will run away for a bit. Use that if one or more attacks you. Break their charge with a rock and keep backing away. Punches and kicks also seem to cause a "tactical retreat" reaction more than weapons do.

In short always try to maintain visual on the wolves get your dogs leashed and the goal is to get far enough away to zoom out so your objective in a fight is to get them to run, not to kill them all. That's what traps are for.
Kind of a necro but I think it is worth it as this is one of the best tips on this forum IMO...

Just to say I tried this and it saved my dogs (and my character). Thank you very much for sharing this method!
This could be a good day to utilize your squirrels hides.

Matti-patti

« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2021, 06:06:03 PM »
I think the most important things for dealing with accidental encounters with wolves are:

1) Always check your six (with the 180 degree turn).
2) When wolf makes sneak attack on you they attack your neck. Always wear all the neck armor you have in any situation you think you might run into wolf in.
3) Don't use pets aside dogs, the rest aggro wolves unerringly. Three to four big or regular dogs make for reasonable team of haulers.

When actually going to hunt wolves:

1) Armor up. And definitely at least mail cowl, cloth cowl (preferably two) and fur hood. Aside that, try to get at least circa 10 tear resistance in every other body part, preferably more.
2) Leave unessential items (water, food, tool axes etc.) elsewhere since you'll be more encumbered than during your typical hunt and wolves are more flighty than bears so you'll end up chasing them more.
3) Patience, my strategy at least is to bring their mobility down with damage and then chase them. Unlike with elks and reindeer I won't be ever bringing one down unless I got it cripple or limp from damage first before chasing it breathless.
4) Always check your six. Even when your are chasing a fleeing wolf down and you think you might be well away from rest of the pack, check your rear from time to time.
5) Consider leaving your dogs elsewhere (tied to a tree on nearby marked tile for example) when going to hunt. They are all but useless at protecting your ass and when they get aggroed they'll just run themselves breathless in the leash. A breathless dog is just giving a fresh wolf opportunity for easy kill.
6) You normally should avoid conifer forests and spruce mires when hunting, but with wolves you'll want to simply stay away as the low visibility can lead to nasty surprises.
7) Don't process the carcass on site of the kill. Either pick it up and carry it elsewhere or go fetch your dogs (a big dog is useful here) and pack it on them. Not a bad idea to ignore the big wolves since they are more of a hassle to carry. Or go kill them last once you have taken down rest of the pack.

Wolf hunting is bit different than regular hunting so it's nice change of pace and I don't think it's any more dangerous than bear hunting if you are careful. I never specifically trap wolves, so for me it's either active hunting or one walking into my lynx/wolverine traps. Too bad the otherwise decently valuable hides have habit of getting bit worn in the process, especially since I don't feel like pulling punches (or axe blows) with them.

EDIT: I lost a few dogs clearing the villages when they got injured and ran away.  I have also lost dogs hunting, but mostly they seem to find their way home eventually.

I once nearly lost a dog simply because it decided to go to sleep in middle of a chase. Luckily once I noticed this I was able to backtrack the tracks of the animal I was chasing (since my other dogs and PC didn't leave any) and find the sleeping dog. Had to abort the hunt though.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2021, 09:59:06 PM by Matti-patti »

 

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