Topic: URW sufficiency mod  (Read 5239 times)


affert

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« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2017, 03:59:31 PM »
One potential bug:

I was trying to make a birchbark canoe.  I was standing right next to a 'Rapids' square and it didn't count as water.  Is this intentional?  Is there a way to make it nearby square is water or rapids?

koteko

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« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2017, 11:06:58 AM »
The bug was supposedly already corrected, so if you have the latest version the fix was wrong :P

Just go inside diy_sufficiency and change the recipe in this way:

Code: [Select]
.Birch-bark canoe. "Punt" *CARPENTRY* [effort:3] [phys:arms,stance] /8h/ %-10% |2|
{Birch-bark} #20# [remove] [ground]
{Tying equipment} (16) [remove] [ground]
{Board} [remove] [ground]
{[NEARBY_TILE:Water]} 'Must be near water'
{Fire} [ground]
{Axe} <Carving axe>
{Knife} <Small knife}
[MATERIAL:birch-bark]

caethan

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« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2017, 01:05:52 AM »
@Kerlysis:  Did some playtesting with the ironworking and tuned it a bit easier, in particular changing the charcoal quality modifier as you suggested and making it easier to level carpentry.  Try it with the updates and see what you think.

caethan

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« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2017, 12:44:10 AM »
Finally got around to adding spinning and weaving.  I borrowed heavily from Rain's mod, with some changes.  It works like this:

  • Harvest hemp, nettle, or flax plants.  Don't thresh them.
  • Stand in water and soak the plants in the water to rot away the woody parts of the stalk.  This will take a while.
  • Gather the retted plants and dry them for several days.
  • Extract the fibre from the plants - this is called scutching and heckling.  Beat the dry stalks with a club and run a stiff comb through to remove the remaining woody stems, leaving the fibres behind.  The fibre at this stage is no longer plant-specific, so everything should stack.
  • Spin the raw fibres into yarn wound onto spools.
  • Weave the yarn into homespun cloth.

Cloth and yarn can be used for a number of things.  First, it makes great cords.  Twine the spun yarn into light-weight cords, great for traveling.  It can also be braided into heavier ropes for use with animals.  You can also tailor your own bags, as well as a selection of homespun clothing.  The basic clothing is light and cool, good for summer wear.  For winter, you can also quilt cloth together with feathers to make clothing as warm as fur but much lighter.

I've done some playtesting but haven't extensively gone through everything yet, so bug reports are appreciated.  Enjoy!

Kerlysis

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« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2017, 03:12:22 AM »
Any thoughts on how the 3.5 beta will affect this mod?

Ametsala

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« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2017, 10:00:50 AM »
I haven't used this mod, but judging from the mod files and the news.txt that came with the newest version, there are two minor changes that this mod would overwrite.

This mod overwrites the encyclopedia (the GAME.NFO file), which got a couple of updates in 3.50 beta. Comparing the encyclopedias of 3.5 and 3.4, the encyclopedia got the following changes:
  • .MYTHOLOGY.SACRED. was edited
  • .SPELLS.INCANTATIONS. replaced the .RITUALS.
  • .RITUAL. (about the skill) was removed
  • .VALUABLES. entry was added (the following individual valuable items were not, despite claiming to be added in nov-19-2017. I suspect they've got the wrong year as the 3.4 file is older than nov-19-2017.)
  • .HUNTING KNIFE. was slightly edited
  • .ELK. and .STAG. were slightly edited
  • .SACRIFICES. was added
  • most of the ritual entries were removed: .FAVOURABLENESS OF THE TRAP. .FINDING THE WAY WHEN GOTTEN LOST. .BANISHING OF THE NÄKKI. .SAFETY OF THE NIGHT. .BANISHIN THE EVIL WATER GUARDIAN.BANISHIN OF THE NÄKKI. .SACRIFICE FOR A NEWLY KILLED ANIMAL. .FISHER'S SACRIFICE FOR A CATCH. .GENERAL SACRIFICE. .FISHER'S REQUEST FOR A CATCH. .HUNTER'S REQUEST TO CATCH A FOX. .PERMISSION TO SLEEP. .PERMISSION TO FALL A TREE. .BLOOD-STANCHING PRAYER. .THE ORIGIN OF FIRE. .THE OATH OF IRON. .HUNTING INCANTATION.

I might have missed some minor changes.

This mod also overwrites the flora_newherbs.txt where bogbean's anti-inflammatory property was misspelled and thus not working. In the 3.4 vanilla version of the file it reads anfi-inflammatory so fixing it is no biggie.

caethan

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« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2017, 08:57:02 PM »
Only just saw the new release!  Will take a look at it tonight and get an update out to ensure compatibility.

Dungeon Smash

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« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2017, 04:11:50 AM »
looking forward to testing!

caethan

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« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2017, 10:17:14 PM »
Updated for 3.5, you can download the 3.5 version here: https://github.com/caethan/urw-sufficiency/tree/3.5beta

That said, the old one should work fine with 3.5, it's just encyclopedia changes and a minor bug fix.  Enjoy!

Puella14

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« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2017, 01:07:43 PM »
Thanks for updating it :)

mlangsdorf

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« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2018, 04:37:49 AM »
My character has gotten through his first summer and is looking to set up a smithy and fabric shop.

Weaving looks easy enough: a day or two of work to set up a spool, comb, distaff, and loom. He's already got ~116 nettles soaking. Though looking at diy_weaving, that'll produce 11.6 lbs of cloth? Is that right? Do I need to go get a lot more nettles and hemp?

More importantly, setting up the smithy:
he'll need to build a bloomery and a forge. Do those need to be set up indoors? Is it useful to build them near water? It is useful to build them near a fireplace? I can see that you need fire for most ironworking recipes, but you can just build an open fire before smithing as far as I can tell.

Basically, I'm curious how most people build their smithies. I've just finished building a rather large house, and I'm not particularly interested in knocking down another 24-42 trees before I can even get started on the smithing - beyond the small forest I'm going to knock down for the charcoal burn, of course.



caethan

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« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2018, 06:53:43 PM »
The weaving process works like this:  raw nettles and hemp weigh 0.5 lbs each, raw flax weighs 1.0 lb each.

  • Raw plant (0.5 lbs)
  • Soaked plant (2.0 lbs)
  • Dried plant (0.25 lbs)
  • Raw fibre (0.1 lbs)
  • Spun yarn (5x fibres needed, 0.5 lbs)
  • Woven cloth (10x yarns needed, 5 lbs)

So the weight of the output fibre/yarn/cloth is one-fifth of the weight of raw plants that go into the process (no weight is lost in spinning and weaving).  If you've got 116 nettles, that's 58 pounds of raw plants, which will produce 11.6 lbs of fibre, just as you say.  That's enough for a fair bit of clothing:  the cloak is the biggest, which takes 6 lbs.  If you want to make quilted items (Which you should!  They're really warm and light!) it'll take more.  I'm obsessive, so I go out and gather a ton of raw nettles - I've got something like 1000 lbs kicking around.  I'll just make it into soup if I get sick of weaving.

As far as smithing, water isn't necessary (although probably should be for tempering) nor is it necessary to have it indoors.  A furnace makes it marginally more convenient, as you won't have to keep relighting a fire for each stage.  I just set mine up outdoors next to my shelter.

Playtesting the smithing with hurt, helpless, and afraid (i.e., no metal axe), I can generally manage to craft myself a metal axe within about 2 months of my start, fitting in smithing between food gathering and other activities.  Once you get a metal axe, it gets much faster, as firewood chopping and charcoal burning is by far the slowest part of smithing.

mlangsdorf

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« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2018, 11:13:27 PM »
So in my testing, the bloomery is a 1000 lb item, not a building. Which surprised me, but that meant I could slowly push it around. I have plans to make a covered patio on the south side of my house near the water and set up the forge there as soon as I finish charcoal and some other stuff.

I'd already purchased masterwork woodsman and splitting axes, so making the wood for 250 units of charcoal was only a few days' work. Burning 250 charcoal - even with fine and masterwork tools - was too long a task for my settler, so I'm currently burning 125 and I'll go back in a few days to finish the job.

I took your advice and collected extra nettles, so now I have ~600 rettles in the process of drying. Which is apparently more than I need but it'll give me something to do come winter.

mlangsdorf

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« Reply #28 on: January 19, 2018, 11:24:55 PM »
As far as quilted clothes go, am I missing something?

Fur leggings: 3.5 lbs
Quilted trousers: 4.5 lbs

Fur shirt: 7 lbs
Quilted tunic: 5.75 lbs

Fur hood: 1.07 lbs
Quilted hood: 1 lbs

You're only saving 1 lb compared to using highly available elk fur, and the elk fur has marginally better protection against tear and squeeze damage (though less against blunt). And quilting takes a lot longer than tanning elk fur.

caethan

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« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2018, 11:36:54 PM »
Yes, what you're missing is the coverage.  The hoods are directly comparable, but the others aren't.  The trousers cover the feet; leggings don't.  And feet are difficult to get coverage for, as socks are hard to come by.  Similarly for shirt vs. tunic - the tunic covers the thighs where the shirt doesn't (albeit the tunic doesn't cover the arms, as the fur shirt is long-sleeved).  And you left out the item where the weight difference is the biggest:  the cloak.  The quilted one weighs 10 pounds, the fur one 14. 

I'd be up for tweaking these if you have suggested improvements, but it's not meant to be an enormous benefit, just a smallish one:  warm clothes that are slightly lighter than furs.